Press "Enter" to skip to content

Stanford Lowballs 2018 GUP Community Benefits

Stanford University plans to expand without new car trips by improving bicycling routes. Photo: Lifestyle Updated

Stanford University is offering just over $1 million worth of four bicycle route projects in exchange for the approval of its 2018 General Use Permit, will would allow the school to expand by 2.3 million square feet over the next 20 years. But the project’s Environmental Impact Report (EIR) doesn’t list any other traffic mitigation measures that Stanford actually proposes to fund and build. The report simply states that because Stanford will continue to meet its “no net new trips” policy with a baseline of 2001 with “Enhanced Transportation Demand Management (TDM)”, in reality there will be no traffic impacts to mitigate.

“Stanford proposes to continue to minimize the transportation impacts of its additional development by implementing a transportation demand management program designed to achieve the No Net New Commute Trips goal. Stanford’s award-winning program to reduce traffic and its related impacts is one of the most comprehensive in the country. Stanford’s transportation demand management program has decreased the drive-alone rate of Stanford commuters from 72 percent in 2002 to 50 percent today.” – Stanford University 2018 General Use Permit Application Summary and Overview

Stanford plans to build new housing on campus – a net 3,150 student housing units – which cuts trips to and from the university altogether.

“The proposed off-site bicycle facility improvements are intended to reduce the potential for local vehicle congestion effects by encouraging use of alternative modes of transportation, and thereby reducing Stanford commuter and other local vehicular trips that contribute to local congestion.” – Stanford University 2018 General Use Permit Draft Environmental Impact Report

Four off-campus bicycle improvement projects are offered to be paid for by Stanford University – most of them are Bike Routes with signs and sharrows, but there are a few bike lanes too. But these are the only “Enhanced TDM” measures described for Stanford to operate all the way to 2035!

East Palo Alto

 

Palo Alto

 

Menlo Park

 

San Mateo County

  • S L

    If there were a small percentage (even1%)of funds going toward Bike/Ped improvements that are spent on the future improvements it would be a massive increase in funds that would make a “Sea Change” of epic proportions.

    As it is, the $1 Million is a ridiculously paltry sum compared to the future impacts of the massive future developments.